Give Hope, Give Life

I know leaving a legacy is one of the best ways to support Amos — indeed it is the one thing I was certain of when I sorted out my own will 17 years ago, when I was pregnant. Writing a charity into your will can be a daunting process. Amos’ Katie Hagley says it doesn’t have to be that way.

Confession time — I’m not afraid to ask for money, I’m a fundraiser, it’s in my DNA and passionately believing in the work Amos does makes it a whole lot easier.

Yet sometimes it feels hard to ask supporters to think about leaving a legacy. It shouldn’t.

I know leaving a legacy is one of the best ways to support Amos — indeed it is the one thing I was certain of when I sorted out my own will 17 years ago, when I was pregnant. For many, the idea of making a will is not easy to talk or think about and this was the case for Debbie.

She told us, “The idea of leaving a legacy seems to belong to another century or to people far richer than myself. Legacies mean facing mortality — for me, saying ‘one day I will die’, was hard. For years, I put my head in the sand relying on an out-of-date will that left my children with a guardian in the event of my demise.

But last year I bit the bullet, found a solicitor and faced the existential dread. It wasn’t complicated and what was interesting was thinking about leaving money to a charity. I’d been involved with Amos long enough to know that its work matters, and I wanted to acknowledge this.

The idea of leaving a legacy seems to belong to another century or to people far richer than myself. Legacies mean facing mortality — for me, saying ‘one day I will die’, was hard.Debbie — Amos legacy-giver

But how much? General funds or a particular project? Would my little amount make any difference? Would the Amos I support now, be an Amos I want to support at my death and does it matter? I decided to talk with staff at Amos — asking how they see legacy giving and what will work for them, and me.

When I looked at what Amos does the decision was clear. I felt a renewed impetus to give what I can NOW, reassess regular giving and to allocate money that whilst I won’t know its impact, whom it helps and how, I can know that Amos will carry on being in the places where it’s needed and it will be there because of people who give during and after life.”

Sue, another Amos supporter and committed giver told us: “We saw the work of Amos Trust whilst in Nicaragua and wanted to make sure our commitment would continue whether we were around or not. It was a simple and natural thing to make sure we left enough money in our wills to ensure this happened.”

After you’ve provided for your loved ones, leaving a legacy to Amos Trust in your will allows us to continue to find creative new ways to challenge injustice, build hope and create change.

We saw the work of Amos Trust whilst in Nicaragua and wanted to make sure our commitment would continue whether we were around or not.Sue

Please consider leaving Amos Trust a legacy in your will, so that the forgotten may live with hope and experience justice. Contact our community team on 020 7588 2638, email us at give@amostrust.org or visit amostrust.org/legacy

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Please support Amos Trust

At the core of Amos Trust’s work are the individuals who support us. Our work is made possible by you. Large or small, your donation makes a real difference.

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CONTACT US

Amos Trust
St Clement’s
1 St Clement’s Court
London
EC4N 7HB
United Kingdom

Telephone:
+44 (0) 20 7588 2638
Email:
office@amostrust.org
Registered Charity No.
1164234

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